More to the Headline than Meets the Eye - Is this Copy of the January 30, 1909 Pittsburg Press Intentional or Just a Revelation of Sorts? Other than the Language, Have Things Changed Much?

Stephen Arch      sparch@comcast.net

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19090120PghMarathon001.jpg

The above photo of the January 9, 2009 of Pittsburgh Marathon coverage appearing in the Pittsburg Press is simply a "copy" of the front page of the Marathon (see "Forgotten history of Steel City's Big Race when marathon was held in winter and Pittsburg was spelled without the 'h'"May 1, 2016 12:00 AM at

http://www.post-gazette.com/sports/pittsburgh-marathon/2016/05/01/Forgotten-history-of-Steel-City-s-big-race-when-marathon-was-held-in-winter-and-Pittsburg-was-spelled-without-the-h/stories/201605010045

However, one image and one "unintenionally published"story attracted my attention even more than the story about the Pittsburgh Marathon.  The first is most obvious to the reading who is paying attention to detail - the drawing of the runners are all men.  Well, isn't that typical of 1909? The 19th Amendment to the Constitution took effect in 1928, and this took    place 19 years after the story.  Men ruled at the time (as just a matter of fact) and women were relegated to the "duties" of women who "help men" succeed.  Not good, but typical of the time.  

However, my attention turned almost automatically to the story "buried" and "grayed out" in the lower right hand corner of the page.  See the headline below:

1909 Pittsburg press.jpg

Remember, this story was published in 1909.  Makes you think, doesn't it? The headline caught my eye, but the Post-Gazette darkened this story in the original Sunday, May 1, 2016 printing, and although the headline is visible, the story is not readable in the newstand edition. But through the use of photo shop I was able to get "the whole story." And as the title of this article indicates, other than the nomenclature, it seems, the more things change, the more they stay the same.